State Commission Says That Michigan should NOT set THC(Marijuana) Limit for Drivers

A state commission says Michigan should not set a legal limit for having THC in your system while driving. The Impaired Driving Safety Commission recently forwarded its research to Gov. Gretchen Whitmer and the Legislature after spending nearly two years studying how marijuana affects drivers.

The Lansing State Journal reports the panel recommended that Michigan set no limit for the amount of marijuana’s active ingredient is in a motorist’s blood.The commission’s report says levels of tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC, in a person’s blood are not a “reliable indicator” of whether they’re impaired.

Which is 100% true. Unlike alcohol THC can be found in your system MONTHS later. The panel instead recommended that the state continue to use roadside sobriety tests to determine if a driver is impaired. Which is the only legitimate way to tell if someone is currently stoned while driving.

Right now, Michigan has a zero tolerance policy, meaning any amount of THC found in your blood could lead to “drugged driving” charges. Which for stoners means you should probably not drive, ever, seeing it can show up in your system month’s later.

“The only reasonable way to do this right now is to demonstrate that people are impaired,” Norbert Kaminski, professor of pharmacology and toxicology at Michigan State University, said. 

Kaminski, who was one of the six members on the commission, said he was happy that Gov. Rick Snyder created the commission to “make logical and rational decisions based on the state of the science.”

Michigan approved medical marijuana use in 2008, and recreational marijuana use last year.

Upper Peninsula Sports Extra
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